Tag Archives: Mac OS

Mac OS: Split-Tunnel VPN

So you’ve already setup a VPN connection to your home or office, but then you realize that you either can’t connect to your VPN network, or you can’t connect to the internet. If you want to have access to both, you’ll need to setup a split-tunnel. On a Mac this is a bit more frustrating than on a Windows machine, so I’ve used some script-foo to make it easier.

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Mac OS: Port Forwarding

 

I’ve been working with virtual machines (VirtualBox) to learn more about Linux as a server environment. It’s great knowing you can revert back to a previous “system snapshot” when you screw up. Even with all this greatness, I was unfortunately having a lot of trouble getting a VM server to connect to other computers. Actually, it was very easy with using a bridged ethernet connection with the server getting a unique IP address. However, a bridged connection is not always available, so I was determined to get it to work with a NAT connection with port forwarding. I needed port 80 to be forwarded to port 8080, and it was a pain but I finally got port forwarding to work. Here’s how to do it on Mac OS.

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Mac OS: Zipping with your terminal

The basic command structure for compressing a file into the zip format with the terminal is:

zip -r <destination> <source>

If you want to compress more than one folder or item:

zip -r <destination> <source1> <source2>...

The source can be a file or folder.

Unfortunately zip is not very smart when it comes to folders and it will save not only the file, but the path to the file as well. We can fix this behavior by adding just a little bit to the original command.

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Mac OS: Command basics – “cd” and “ls”

For those out there that are new to using Terminal, or need a quick review, this is a quick overview of the “cd” and “ls” commands. These two commands are the basic tools for navigating the file structure “inside” of your Mac. Once these two are mastered, you will be able to comfortably move onto doing cooler, more complicated commands that can be run in Terminal. Continue reading Mac OS: Command basics – “cd” and “ls”